Letters

hub-logo-white

What's on your mind?

The Hub would love to hear from you. Email your letters, articles, photos, drawings, cartoons, YouTube or Vimeo links to [email protected].

middle-header-letters2

splitting-regEditor:

The Harper Conservative government has recently introduced a federal tax credit billed as the "Family Tax Cut" (income splitting) that will allow a higher-income spouse to transfer up to $50,000 of taxable income to a spouse in a lower tax bracket. The credit provides up to $2,000 for couples with children under the age of 18 and is effective for the 2014 tax year. This will cost public coffers about $2.4- billion in 2014-2015 and roughly $2-billion per year until 2019-20. This uses up a vast sum of the (alleged) coming surplus on one inequitable tax program.

cuts-regEditor:

With the municipal election behind us, the idea of contracting out existing services will start to emerge at council meetings. Moving from having the responsibility of full-time employees to a single priced contractor seems to be the latest way of controlling costs.

There are two ways a contract bidder can win a contract. One is to become a better manager then the predecessor (the municipality). This may mean searching for innovative ways of doing the same job, possibly with better tools or a better scheduling system. Bravo for that contractor.

wind-regDear Editor:

The long awaited Divisional Court Charter Challenge of three industrial wind turbine projects wrapped up on Thursday, November 20th. The Appeal went before Justices F.N. Marocco, D.M. Brown and J.R. Henderson at the Courthouse in London. Arguments were made by Julian Falconer and team, counsel for the four families (Drennan, Dixon, Ryan & Kroeplin) objecting to the proximity of industrial wind turbines to their homes in the 140 turbine K2 (Drennan) and 15 turbine St. Columban (Dixon & Ryan) wind projects currently under construction in Huron County, and the 92 turbine Armow Wind Project (Kroeplin) being constructed in Bruce County.

climate-featEditor;

I'm not sure where all the climate change deniers who work for Sun Media live. They don't seem to live in the world I do, or the world that lies outside my door. While Owen Sound residents complain about the cost of running the city, I don't think they realize the increasing cost to the city that is clearly attributed to climate change, nor to the even higher cost that is anticipated in the near future. City sewers, roads and roofs are designed to withstand "normal" weather conditions and not for what are now becoming annual events that were once expected every 100 years. If our city is to plan for the "new" future weather anticipated by climate change, we'd better be ready to spend big dollars to do this.

Hub-Bottom-Tagline

CopyRight ©2015, ©2016, ©2017 of Hub Content
is held by content creators