Whip-regBy Jenny Parsons

What do whipped votes and dead money have in common? No, they are not ska-punk bands names. These are the concepts that are still forefront in mind after hours of guest speaker-talks and intense conversations had at the Green Party Convention held in New Brunswick this month.

wind-regularBy Andre Den Tandt

In the 1970s the names of Donald Johanson and Lucy, the relatively complete pre-hominid skeleton he discovered in Ethiopia, were regularly in the news. So were Louis and Mary Leakey, who had preceded him into Africa and Olduvai Gorge in what is now Kenya. The tools and skeletons they found belonged to upright-walking pre-hominids, and they were clearly older than the 6000 or so years that Bishop James Ussher had determined as the time since creation as told in Genesis.

transit-question-regularBy Anne Finlay-Stewart

What constitutes a core service? Bernice Ackermann used the term in her address to Owen Sound council when she asked for its support for Transit Tuesday, a July 15 event to celebrate 70 years of buses in the city and to encourage Owen Sounders to leave their cars at home.

While the mayor and councillors have often referred to city transit as important, even essential, bus advocates fear that short-term cost-saving will trump long-term vision in the city's decisions on this file. A special council meeting July 24 at 4 p.m. may tell the tale.

miranda-stanner-regularBy Miranda Miller

Four years ago this October, Owen Sound residents seemed to signal it was time for a change. Mayoral incumbent Ruth Lovell Stanners was unseated in a narrow victory, with just 41 extra votes for victor Deborah Haswell.

Lovell Stanners may just get her third shot at the seat; she's the only mayoral candidate registered to date.

Gulcha-regularBy Dennis Thompsett

In the late 60s, Dave Hoath wrote a song called "The No Vote in Dry Gulch," referring to Owen Sound. The song was often performed by Dave and Barry Hilchey. At that time Owen Sound was known, and proudly, as the largest dry city in Christendom, so it was sort of a satirical protest song.

But if the Dry Gulch song worked at all, it worked very slowly. There were at least six big hotels I can think of downtown, and dozens of classy restaurants, but you could not, by law, order an alcoholic drink in any of them until 1972.






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