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by Cathy Hird

Do you know how to find out if someone is truly a Canadian? Stomp on their toe and wait for them to say "Sorry." Only a Canadian apologizes when someone else bumps into them.

After three years in Ghana, my daughter absorbed their use of "Sorry." When I mention something that did not go right, she says, "Sorry." This is not a personal apology, but rather an expression of lament, her sense that it is regrettable that this happened.

"Sorry" is a helpful word in our relationships. When we hurt someone by what we say or do, it helps if we apologize. We do have to act on our regret after saying "Sorry" but acknowledging the hurt is important.

Sometimes when someone says they are sorry, we are not sure how deeply they mean what they say. It seems that they just want to hurry past the difficult moment. They know that we are upset, but they don't actually think what they did was wrong. They do not understand our reaction. Perhaps they have done the same thing before, and we expect they will do it again. At times like these, we do not think they really are sorry.

Denise-featWhen Denise Freeman and her partner Edward Marchewka take their long-haired dachshund Winston out for his daily constitutional, the trip does double duty. The pair have made it their practice to pick up trash as they walk through their west-side neighbourhood, making every day an Earth Day.

treatypeole-featureTwo of Canada's most prestigious authors and historians will be visiting Owen Sound June 6 on the invitation of the M'Wikwedong Native Cultural Resource Centre. The event is part of the program called Wasa Nabin, an Ojibway word meaning "to look forward".
The theme of the day will be "We are all Treaty People". While the details of the presentations of Maracle and Saul are still in discussion, their recent work suggests a powerful day of challenged assumptions.

treatypeole-featureTwo of Canada's most prestigious authors and historians will be visiting Owen Sound June 6 on the invitation of the M'Wikwedong Native Cultural Resource Centre. The event is part of the program called Wasa Nabin, an Ojibway word meaning "to look forward".
The theme of the day will be "We are all Treaty People". While the details of the presentations of Maracle and Saul are still in discussion, their recent work suggests a powerful day of challenged assumptions.

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